Nelson Ruiz No Comments

Several insect species in Arizona are considered pests within human dwellings, but not all insect pest species in the state are able to survive and reproduce within homes for indefinite periods of time. This is the case when it comes to seasonal insect house pests, such as boxelder bugs, elm leaf beetles, and cluster flies. These insect pests invade homes in large numbers during the fall in order to overwinter, but they are unable to reproduce indoors, and unless they eventually re-establish an outdoor presence, they will perish within homes. However, the most common and pestiferous insect pests commonly found in Arizona homes, like cockroaches, termites, house flies, bed bugs, carpet beetles, and many ant species, establish reproductive populations indoors. These insect pests are able to establish lasting indoor infestations that can be difficult to eradicate.

Some of the most common ant pests in Arizona that are able to establish indoor nests that contain reproductive queens include southern fire ants, thief ants and carpenter ants. Most indoor nesting ant pests species, such as southern fire ants and carpenter ants, can only establish thriving indoor colonies if they establish nests within moist areas. Unlike southern fire ants, carpenter ants establish nests within moist structural wood within homes, but just like southern fire ants, carpenter ants usually establish nests outside of wood within moist wall voids in bathrooms, around plumbing and near water heaters. These two pests also feed on indoor food sources. Of course, indoor thief ants must also be well hydrated in order to thrive within homes, but these pests tend to nest indoors in order to regularly feed on a variety of human food sources. These food sources include meats, cheeses and grease. While all these ant pests, and the majority of others, are able to nest indoors, they may also nest within soil and damp tree hollows located near the foundation of homes. In these cases, ant pests enter homes from outside nests solely to seek water and human food sources.

Have you ever experienced pest issues with southern fire ants?

 

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