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INTERACTIVE PEST & INSECT GAMES FOR KIDS

INTERACTIVE PEST & INSECT GAMES FOR KIDS

LOVE GAMES? PLAY THE INTERACTIVE INSECT AND PEST GAMES, OR TRY TO ACE OUR QUIZZES ON BUG TRIVIA.

Mysterious and exciting, the world of pests challenges us to understand what attracts them to our homes and yards. Test your pest knowledge and skills with these insect and bug games for kids of all ages!

BUG BUILDER

Just like humans, all insects have unique characteristics that set them apart from one another. Now you can build your own bug species by combining different body parts and adding fun items, like sunglasses and hats, to your masterpiece!

PLAY

SORT THE BUGS

Think you know how to handle a pest problem? Test your ultimate pest control skills using different household items, including a vacuum cleaner and tweezers, in this four-in-one game!

PLAY

CRUSH THAT BUG

Don’t let pests take over your home! Match three or more bugs in any direction to prevent them from becoming uninvited houseguests! If you’re a fan of popular games like Candy Crush, you won’t want to miss this.

PLAY

ARCHIBALD’S ADVENTURE

Archibald is a very fussy odorous house ant who must find food for his colony while staying out of harms way and avoiding unknown dangers inside the home. He needs your help to complete his mission by locating and plundering the legendary sugar bowl on the far-off kitchen counter.

PLAY

PEST RANGERS

Pest Commander Pete needs your help! Join the elite Pest Rangers and search out pest problems in a typical home. Using special super hero gear to see through solid walls and spot the invisible, can you outwit the insects and rodents who have made your house into their home?

PLAY

PEST DETECTIVE

Pests are just insects or animals looking for a meal and a place to live. But, when they take a wrong turn into your house, it’s not pretty. Many types of pests can spread diseases and destroy property. That’s where you come in. You are a Pest Detective and it is your job to find out what happened and which pest did it.

PLAY

BUG BIOLOGY QUIZ

If you’re a bug beginner, this quiz is for you! Test your knowledge of bug biology and fun facts.

TAKE THE QUIZ

INSECT TRIVIA QUIZ

Think you’re a pest expert? Take this quiz to see how much you really know about the wonderful world of insects.

TAKE THE QUIZ

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Fall Pest Proofing Tips!

As the days get shorter and falling temperatures force people to become homebodies, many pests will have the same idea.  Magic pest Control reminds homeowners that rodents, squirrels, cockroaches and spiders may try to find their way inside to escape the coming chill, bringing with them a number of health risks.Exterminators Mesa AZ

One of the best ways to get homes ready for the fall and winter months is to conduct a simple check of the home and perform any necessary maintenance.  Proactive and vigilant fall pest-proofing is crucial in preventing pests from coming indoors

Besides being a nuisance and irksome, these pests can also pose serious risks — rodents spread diseases such as Salmonella, contaminate food and can damage drywall and electrical wires throughout a home. Cockroaches trigger allergies and asthma, especially in children, and some species of spiders may bite if their hiding spot is discovered.

Magic Pest Control recommends these pest-proofing tips for the fall season:

  • Screen attic vents and openings to chimneys.
  • Eliminate moisture sites, including leaking pipes and clogged drains.
  • Seal cracks and crevices on the outside of the home using caulk and steel wool. Pay close attention where utility pipes enter the structure.
  • Store food in airtight containers and dispose of garbage regularly in sealed receptacles.
  • Replace loose mortar and weather stripping around the basement foundation and windows.
  • Store firewood at least 20 feet away from the house; keep shrubbery well-trimmed.
  • Install door sweeps and repair damaged screens.
  • Inspect items such as boxes of decorations and grocery bags before bringing them indoors.
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Tips to Keep Pests Out of Your House This Fall

  • Screen attic vents, openings to chimneys and any other areas that are open to the outdoors, like mail slots and animal doors.
  • Keep basements, attics and crawl spaces well ventilated and dry. Consider using a dehumidifier in these areas.
  • Keep kitchen counters clean, store food in airtight containers and dispose of garbage regularly in sealed receptacles.
  • Replace weather-stripping and repair loose mortar around the foundation and windows.
  • Inspect boxes of decorations, package deliveries and grocery bags for pest damage before bringing them indoors.
  • Avoid leaving pets’ food dishes out for long periods of time.
  • Contact a licensed pest control professional if an infestation is suspected.
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The Rarest And Most Valuable Arthropod Species Were Stolen From An Insectarium In Philadelphia

Believe it or not, but there is such a thing as a “valuable insect.” At the moment, researchers estimate that somewhere around 925,000 insects have been described by scientists. However, there could be as much as 30 million insect species in the world, and no fewer than 2 million. There exists as many as billions of individual insects per species. This amounts to a whole lot of insects. Given how abundant insects are in the environment, it is surprising to learn that any insect species could be considered “valuable.” After all, are there really any insect species that could be considered endangered? Well, as it happens, there are many insect species that are categorized as being “endangered,” but not many. Out of nearly 1,300 analyzed insect species, 600 are considered to be in danger of becoming extinct. Therefore, it should not be surprising to learn that there are numerous insect species that are considered rare and even valuable. Many of these rare and valuable insects, and spiders as well, are kept in the Philadelphia Insectarium. Unfortunately, criminals have recently robbed the insectarium, and it was not a small scale heist.

The CEO of the insectarium, John Cambridge, has claimed that somewhere between 80 to 90 percent of the insectarium’s arthropod specimens were stolen. Cambridge believes that this heist was an inside job, and he is not alone, as the police believe that three former employees are responsible for pulling off the caper.

Exotic tarantulas, millipedes and scorpions were among the different creatures stolen from the complex. Not only are the creatures rare, but, according to Cambridge, they are essential for maintaining the proper functioning of the ecosystem. Cambridge also claimed that some of the stolen creepy-crawly specimens were worth as much as 50,000 dollars. Cambridge is hoping that, at least, the bandits know how to properly care for the delicate and endangered creatures.

Do you think that rare insects could be desired for reasons other than their dollar value?

 

 

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You Would Not Believe Where Pest Control Operators Have Found Insect Infestations

You Would Not Believe Where Pest Control Operators Have Found Insect Infestations

Many people will have to contact a pest control professional at least once during their lifetime. When your home is infested with termites, roaches or spiders, your best friend in the world is your pest control operator. Although some of you may have made polite small talk with the pest control professionals during past inspections, you likely have no idea what a day in the life of a pest control operator is actually like.

As you probably know, insect pests can infest the strangest of places where you would never expect insect infestations to take form. For example, on one occasion a pest control specialist with the University of Wisconsin in Madison was called to a parking lot over a purported ant infestation within a parking meter. When the pest control professional, Richard Ness, arrived at the parking lot, he found that the parking meter in question had already been shut off, and a few ants were spotted crawling nearby, but not enough to constitute an infestation. The call had turned out to be legitimate, as Ness quickly became bombarded with ants after opening the meter’s service door. In response, Ness used a spray to flush the ants out of the meter.

After taking a moment to closely observe a few of the ants, Ness became convinced that the ants were the notorious odorous house ants. These ants get their name from the coconut odor that they emit when they are threatened or crushed. Ness took a few specimens to be analyzed at the University, and it turned out that his judgement was correct. Later on, during the very same day, Ness was called to a different location where another strange insect infestation had been found. This time the insects were cockroaches, and they had been found in a dorm near the campus. This was a normal call for Ness, but for non-insect experts, this particular insect infestation seems like something out of horror films.

Students within the dorm had been complaining about cockroaches appearing out of nowhere. It turned out that cockroaches had been accessing the building through sewer pipes. According to Ness, cockroaches travel up drains and into homes and buildings when ground water evaporates. This evaporation makes the normally damp sewer pipes relatively dry, which does not agree with cockroaches. In an effort to locate a moist environment, cockroaches will follow the air current that flows up pipes until they arrive within a moist sink or bathtub. So think about that the next time you use the toilet.

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Lawmakers Oppose Funding Into Edible Insect Research

It is probably fair to say that most of the American public is disgusted by edible insect meals. Now, lawmakers in the United States are disgusted by the government funds going into edible insect research. Most Americans want nothing to do with edible insects, so it is likely that they do not want to see their tax dollars being spent on research into eating bugs. This is why lawmakers from multiple states have gone on the record in their opposition to edible insect research being funded with taxpayer money. In fact, some politicians are attempting to pass a bill that would prohibit the use of taxpayer dollars in edible insect research projects.About Pest Control in Phoenix, Gilbert, Mesa, Queen Creek

Senator Jeff Flake from Arizona is leading the charge against federally funded edible insect research. Flake is not opposed to edible insects, but he does not want taxpayer dollars going to startup businesses that specialize in edible insect production. According to Flake, this type of spending is just another example of careless government spending. Flake is not alone, as he and many other senators and congressman are looking to make amendments to a particular House spending package that allows government entities to spend as much as 100,000 dollars on edible insect projects. Flake’s amendment would block taxpayer dollars from going into the hands of edible insect companies.

One business owner who specializes in cricket feed says he has not yet felt the heat from Senator Flake. The California-based business is called Tiny Farms Inc., and it is run by Andrew Brentano, who is currently serving as the company’s CEO. According to Brentano, his business, as well as many others he knows of, has received funding from the USDA with no problems. Brentano firmly believes that federal funding into edible insects is not a waste of money, as edible insects could end up saving billions if it were to displace livestock meat as the primary source of protein for Americans.

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Neuroscientists Have Revealed How Humans Really Feel About Insects

Having a fear of insects is not uncommon. Even those people who claim to be fearless when encountering creepy-crawlies still probably become startled upon unexpectedly seeing one in their home. Since a few insects can inflict painful, or even deadly bites or stings, our instinctive fear of them keeps us safe. It is generally believed that humans developed this sense of fear over the course of evolution in order to recognize and avoid threats to our survival. However, how do we know that we are really experiencing “fear” when encountering creepy-crawlies? After all, the feeling of being scared does not necessarily match the feeling experienced during arthropod encounters.

Obviously, being alone in the dark, watching scary movies, or being stocked by a stranger elicits feelings of fear, but seeing a creepy looking arthropod, like a tarantula or a praying mantis, does not make us feel the same way. Of course, this is not to say that arthropod encounters don’t elicit negative feelings that make people uncomfortable, but perhaps we humans have been misjudging our own feelings toward insects. Many people would argue that the feelings that one experiences upon unexpectedly finding a creepy arthropod are merely subjective feelings that differ from individual to individual. This is a sensible opinion, but most neuroscientists would disagree. A recent study had researchers examining how our brains function upon finding insects. As it turns out, we are not scared of these multi-legged creatures at all, but we are certainly disgusted by them.

Scientists from the Georgia Institute of Technology have recently determined that the part of the human brain associated with disgust, and not fear, becomes activated upon finding insects. The feeling of disgust is associated with contamination and disease. This finding surprised the researchers that had been expecting to record a neurological fear response, but the fear centers remained inactive upon exposure to insects. Understandably, the study subjects became particularly disgusted upon seeing the common household insects that are capable of spreading disease pathogens, such as roaches. In fact, household insects elicited more fear in the subjects than insects in the wild. This makes sense, as humans have naturally become conditioned to fear the very pathogen-spreading insects that we encounter most often.

After reading this blog article, do you find it easy to believe that insects elicit feelings of disgust rather than fright? Or do you feel like the study’s finding runs contrary to your own feelings when finding an insect in your home?

 

 

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Out Of Control Urban Fly Populations Terrified Americans During The Early Twentieth Century

Out Of Control Urban Fly Populations Terrified Americans During The Early Twentieth Centurymagicpest-logo

Today, everyone should be familiar with the various ways in which people can protect themselves from dangerous insect pests. Mosquitoes are the modern insect threat to be controlled, and American public health officials are doing their best to share with the public the various measures that can be taken to avoid sustaining bites from disease-carrying mosquitoes. Insect pests have always been a threat to humans, and it is impossible to find a time in history when there was not an insect menace to fear. For example, back in 1900, Americans were terrified of flies. The flies that were feared during this time were not exotic flies that bit people or spread disease; instead, the insect threat came from simple houseflies. It may be hard to believe that Americans used to fear houseflies, as they are encountered on a daily basis during the summer, but the American government used to be convinced that houseflies possessed disease-spreading potential. During the early twentieth century, government-employed public health officials were not shy about sharing the housefly threat with the America public. As you can imagine, the American public responded to these warnings with mass panic.

Today we take garbage-disposal services for granted. Believe it or not, public garbage-disposal has not always been an established part of life in America. Prior to the mainstream use of vehicles, horses were common, and they left massive amounts of manure in the streets, as did many other animals. At the time, public health officials feared that flies would spread disease to humans after making contact with the bacteria-rich manure that littered the streets of Washington DC. Houseflies used to be viewed as filthy, as they were well known to swarm near decaying carcasses as well. One educator at the time falsely claimed that fly-borne disease killed seventy thousand Americans every year. The threat of fly-borne disease prompted activists and public health officials to demand that the government dispose of the tons of manure in urban regions. Public health officials recommended that citizens of manure-saturated urban areas install screens on their doors and windows in order to prevent the entrance of flies. However, the calls for public sanitation reforms were halted by experts who had claimed that houseflies were not spreaders of disease. Luckily, pioneers in the field of medical entomology pressed for better public sanitation programs in order to control the fly supposed menace. Eventually, the overabundance of flies subsided along with the progressive decrease of public manure heaps.

Do you think that you too would have worried about disease-carrying flies if you lived during the first half of the twentieth century?

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Pest Control Q & A

Phoenix Pest Control Q & A

What makes homes attractive to pests?

Pests are attracted to food, water and shelter. Exclusion techniques and removing food and water sources will help deter pests. Simple measures such as keeping food in sealed containers and cleaning up after each meal to avoid leaving crumbs can help. Fix leaky pipes and drains to ensure that if pests do get in, they won’t have ideal conditions in which they can thrive.

How do pests get into homes?

Pests enter structures through cracks and crevices around windows, doors, along foundations, ripped screens, uncapped chimneys, and also through holes where utilities enter a structure. Firewood, groceries, and other deliveries can carry pests in, too. Seal any openings with silicone caulk or steel wool, and to avoid hitchhiking pests, examine packages thoroughly before bringing them inside.

Where are pests most likely to settle in?

Pests have direct access to basements and attics through roofs and foundations, so they should be kept well ventilated, dry, and clutter-free. Also, because of the concentration of food and water, kitchens and bathrooms are other common areas.

What should I do if I have an infestation?

Despite even the best efforts, pests can still find their way inside. If you have a pest problem or need advice on how to better pest-proof your home, contact a qualified and licensed pest control professional, like Magic Pest Control.

For more information on common household pests, please visit www.magicpest.com