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The Biting And Stinging Insects That Commonly Infest And Damage Swimming Pools In Arizona

The Biting And Stinging Insects That Commonly Infest And Damage Swimming Pools In Arizona

Most Americans are not familiar with any aquatic insect species, but most would assume that such insects could not exist in the excessively dry Sonoran desert region within Arizona. Although this assumption may seem sensible, the state is, in fact, home to several aquatic insect species. If there is one group of residents in Arizona who are aware of aquatic insects within the state, then it would probably be residential pool owners since it is not uncommon for swimming pools to become infested with aquatic insects. But aquatic insects are not the worst group of insect pests that Arizona pool owners may have to deal with on occasion, as there also exists a stinging wasp species that frequents residential pools for a cool drink during the summer season. In some cases, wasp swarms can take shape around swimming pools in Arizona, putting residents at serious risk of sustaining potentially dangerous stings.

Some insect pests that are commonly found within Arizona pools are not necessarily attracted to the water as much as they are attracted to the lights within and around a pool. For example, insects that are attracted to artificial light sources, like moths, some beetle species and leafhoppers, often fall into pools where their corpses can become numerous. If swimming pools and surrounding yard vegetation is not maintained, then pools will eventually become inundated with mosquitoes and midges looking to use the large water source as a site for reproduction and egg laying.

A common group of aquatic insects in Arizona known as backswimmers cannot tell the difference between natural water sources and pool water, so infestations of these insects within swimming pools is to be expected. The sharp mouthparts possessed by these insects can damage pool lining, and they will not hesitate to bite any that human who dares to share a pool with them. A water-scavenging beetle species, Tropisternus californicus, can also infest Arizona swimming pools where they have been known to bite bathers. The most troubling pool pest in Arizona may be the yellow paper wasp, or the swimming pool wasp. This may be the most commonly complained about insect pest within Arizona pools, and many residents have first hand knowledge of this insect’s ability to survive long periods below the water’s surface. Since yellow paper wasps can sting humans, professional pest control assistance is highly recommended for residents who find these insects around their pool.

Have you ever witnessed a large insect swarm around a swimming pool?

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A Brown Recluse Spider Bite Caused A Woman To Hallucinate And Become Paralyzed, And There Are Dozens More Hiding In Her Home

The brown recluse spider may not look intimidating, but it is one of the most dangerous spider species in the United States. According to medical experts, around ten percent of brown recluse spider bites to humans result in tissue death, but negative health consequences can be felt by bite victims who never develop serious infections. For example, last summer a Tennessee woman, Angela Wright, experienced hallucinations and temporary paralysis in response to brown recluse venom alone. In fact, the one bite that Angela sustained nearly gave her a fatal stroke.

Wright woke one morning with pain in one of her arms and small bumps on her chest. Angela eventually visited the doctor where she was prescribed medication for the bumps, but her symptoms became worse. Soon after, Angela began to hallucinate and she developed seemingly bizarre symptoms such as sharp chest pains, flu-like symptoms and eventual paralysis. It turned out that the bite had formed two blood clots within Angela’s lungs. These clots brought Angela dangerously close to having a stroke. The doctors who treated Angela claimed that the neurotoxic components within brown recluse venom caused her to experience hallucinations.

Angela refused to sleep within her apartment for one more night, as she had found dozens of the spiders infesting her apartment unit before she visited the hospital. Angela had complained to the apartment managers about the infestation, and the managers responded by sending a pest control professional to her room to spray insecticide, but the spiders remained. Sadly, this one bite may have caused lasting medical problems, as doctors believe that Angela will have to remain on blood-thinning medication for her entire life as a result of the clots. Angela is also experiencing sudden bouts of pain in her chest. Due to the risks associated with blood clots, Angela’s doctors recommended that she avoid having children for life.

Have you ever killed a brown recluse spider that you found indoors?