Nelson Ruiz No Comments

Why Problematic Termites Are Beneficial In Times Of Drought

Why Problematic Termites Are Beneficial In Times Of Drought

Just about everyone is well aware of the fact that termites inflict significant damage to timber-framed structures, but fewer people are aware of the fact that termites consume wood in order to secure the nutritious cellulose that makes up all forms of plant material. Therefore, termites can also consume smaller wooden items, the paper in books or even champagne corks. Termite damage to structural wood is almost always inflicted by subterranean termites, while both dampwood and drywood termites are the most frequent culprits behind infestations found in smaller objects containing cellulose. Pest control professionals encounter subterranean termite infestations in structural wood far more often than they encounter drywood or dampwood infestations in smaller wooden objects. Subterranean termite damage to structures accounts for a majority of the economic costs of termite damage, which is around 5 billion dollars per year. While subterranean termites may be one of the most economically devastating insect pests that exist, they may also mitigate the negative effects of long-running droughts.

Scientists have long known that termites play an essential role in the health of the ecosystem, as they aerate soil with their subterranean tunneling activity and convert dead plant matter to fertile soil. But now, scientists have found evidence that termites allow soil to retain significant levels of moisture during times of drought. In a large forested area, researchers compared the moisture levels in soil that had been inhabited by subterranean termites with soil that had been free of termites. When droughts did not occur, moisture levels in each area of land remained the same, but during a 20 year drought, termite-inhabited soil retained enough moisture to allow for plant growth. Considering this finding, subterranean termites, although harmful to structures, can maintain a soil fertility during even the most significant of drought periods, thus allowing for the survival of economically valuable cropland.

Considering the above described study, do you believe that subterranean termite activity in crop-soil could be of benefit during dry spells?

 

Nelson Ruiz No Comments

Man Is Arrested For Transporting Exotic Scorpions, Spiders And Earwigs Via Airline Travel

A Man Is Arrested For Transporting Exotic Scorpions, Spiders And Earwigs Via Airline Travel

It is well known that transporting certain animals across national and/or state borders is illegal, and this is especially the case when it comes to the international transport of endangered species. In addition to endangered species, it is obviously in violation of most country’s national and/or state laws to transport potentially dangerous animals, and animals that are known disease vectors across certain set borders. This makes the international transport of many insect and arachnid species illegal. US laws prohibiting the transport of certain insects and arachnids vary from state to state, but in some countries where certain exotic bugs are plentiful, individuals can be met with harsh penalties when caught smuggling particular arthropod species beyond national borders. Although such laws are usually well known to citizens of such countries, it is not uncommon for customs agents to catch individuals violating these laws. For example, in the country of South Africa, the act of transporting certain arthropods out of the country is well understood by its citizens to be legally prohibited. Despite this, one individual was recently arrested for being in possession of certain scorpion, spider and earwig species with the intention of smuggling them out of the country by airline.

Authorities with the Prince Albert and Stock Theft Unit at Beaufort West in Western Cape, South Africa arrested a 23 year old man after 21 scorpions, 2 spiders and 2 earwigs were found in his hotel room. This man, who’s name has not been released to the media, was arrested for failing to provide documentation to prove that was in lawful possession of the arthropods. The arthropods were found in buckets within his hotel room closet, and the particular species of each arthropod group were not mentioned. The arthropods were seized and handed over to the Nature Conservation in South Africa. The arthropods are highly valued on the black market, as they are estimated as being worth R16,000, which is around 12,000 US dollars. The Nature Conservation will later provide an exact dollar amount.

Have you ever witnessed an individual being taken into custody for smuggling arthropods at an airport or border check?

Nelson Ruiz No Comments

Cockroach Prevention is Necessary for Protecting Health

Cockroach Prevention is Necessary for Protecting Health | Phoenix Pest Control Experts

Often times when people are experiencing allergy and asthma symptoms, they automatically chalk it up to the time of year without considering that their stuffy nose and itchy eyes could actually be triggered by the presence of cockroaches in their home. In addition to exacerbating asthma and allergy symptoms, cockroaches are also capable of spreading 33 kinds of bacteria, including Salmonella and E. coli. This makes it all the more important to take the necessary steps to eliminate food, water and harborage sites for cockroaches within the home.

Maintaining excellent sanitation is one of the best practices in protecting the home against cockroaches. Magic Pest Control recommends the below cleaning tips:

  • Kitchen: Keep counters, sinks, tables and floors meticulously clean every day. Clean dishes, crumbs and spills right away, store food in airtight containers and always avoid leaving food out—including pet food. Vacuum any crumbs stuck in corners and around cabinets, and regularly clean cabinets out with soap and water. Check under sinks and clean under appliances for moisture issues, and quickly address any found.
  • Bathroom: Cockroaches are attracted to moisture and can only survive for a week without water, so always wipe up standing water around sinks, tubs and toilets. Fix leaky faucets and ensure sinks are clear of water before bedtime—cockroaches are nocturnal and will typically emerge to search for water and food at night when the house is dark and quiet.
  • Basement: Eliminate clutter where possible to reduce hiding spaces for cockroaches. Basement windows and areas where weather-stripping has become worn are frequent points of access for cockroaches, so homeowners should be sure to seal any cracks or crevices using caulk, steel wool or a combination of both.

For more information visit www.magicpest.com

Why Scientists Want To Preserve Fireflies

Why Scientists Want To Preserve Fireflies

Fireflies may be the most beloved of all insects. As children, the sight of fireflies glowing on and off in the distance was nothing short of fascinating. For many adults, fireflies not only conjure up pleasant memories from childhood, but their glowing bodies indicate that summer has officially arrived. Fireflies are immediately recognizable, and many children never tire of attempting to capture the bugs in mason jars, but how much do people really know about fireflies? As it turns out, fireflies are more than just an interesting group of insects, as firefly activity can indicate the relative health of a particular ecosystem. Unfortunately, this means that, much like other insect species today, firefly populations are decreasing due to environmental hazards. In response to this loss in firefly life, experts formed the Firefly Watch project at the Museum of Science in Boston. This project aims to preserve and track firefly populations in America.

The Firefly Watch project recruits thousands of citizen scientists from all fifty states and several Canadian provinces in order to track trends in firefly populations around North America. Starting just a couple of months ago, the Firefly Watch program was taken over by Mass Audubon. This organization is working closely with Tufts University in order to continue the research started by the Firefly Watch program. Mass Audubon is still looking for more citizen scientists; anybody can sign up for the project by visiting the Museum of Science in Boston website.

Researchers also want to preserve fireflies due to their value in the field of medicine. Fireflies are helping researchers to understand how diseases such as cancer and muscular dystrophy attack human cells. Fireflies have also been used to detect food spoilage and bacterial contamination. Perhaps most surprising is the fact that fireflies are even used by NASA officials when developing instruments that are designed to detect life beyond our own planet.

Have you ever attempted to catch fireflies as an adult? Did the fireflies that you captured as a child live longer than a single day in captivity?

Nelson Ruiz No Comments

Everything You Need to Know about Bees in Gilbert

Everything You Need to Know about Bees in Gilbert
Bees are amazing. They bring us luscious and beautiful flowers, tasty local honey as well as vegetables and fruits, and keep many aspects of nature running as it should be. In Arizona, it is at exactly this time of the year when flowers are at their full bloom, somewhere between February and April, depending on the weather, when bees make their full appearance known.

There are 2 main types of bees: non-social bees and social bees. Let’s break down what you can expect to see this bee season and how to react when you do see some bees.

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How To Keep Termites From Destroying Your Home

How To Keep Termites From Destroying Your Home

The professional word for these ravenous mash eaters is cryptobiotic: They’re so great at finding the stowaway, you may not know they’re there—but rather they are. The most widely recognized underground assortment settles in the clammy soil in each state spare Alaska. While termites might be useful in the woodland, where all that crunching dispatches dead stumps, when they move from the yard to your home, they can wipe you out. What’s more, think about what: Insurance doesn’t cover the harm. Here’s the way to abstain from transforming your greatest speculation into a creepy crawly gut work.

They’re subtle

Termites tiptoe through soggy mulch and soil, while winged ones fly amid swarming season—which is currently. Be that as it may, they settle outside of anyone’s ability to see. An invasion may not become visible until the point that you remodel or an auditor jabs around.

They overshare

Scavenging laborers leave the home looking for sustenance, frequently scored in a warm, moist place, similar to an inadequately vented slither space. They at that point return home to share the ingested products, utilizing an expertise known as “the common trade of gut substance”— net, yet accommodating in conveying poison through a state.

They have a desire for…

Foragers are attracted to rotting wood and plants, a few sorts more than others, and warmed up if conceivable—a board under a releasing high temp water pipe, say. They burrow through the delicate springwood, deserting the harder grain, making the present milder, quick developed wood a genuine termite treat. FYI: Several settlements can flourish in one house.

They eat relentlessly

Eating every minute of every day, they utilize dampness, sharp mandibles, and intestinal smaller scale living beings to hand cellulose over wood, plants, and even paper into sustenance.

They leave confirm

Giveaways incorporate light wood and thin mud tubes, which termites make with spit and bits of wood or drywall; on the off chance that you tear one open and see specialists, you have an issue. Swarmers shed their wings previously tunneling outside of anyone’s ability to see; in the event that you discover shed wings inside, bring in an ace.

They have complex social lives

A detailed standing framework doles out errands: rummaging; bolstering and preparing different termites; shoring up the settlement’s safeguards; and basically increasing. When swarmers discover succulent landscape and shed their wings, they begin reproducing to shape a subcolony or another one. It might take a long time to develop, and afterward it implies inconvenience.

Step by step instructions to Keep Them Out

Remove their nourishment and water

Store kindling no less than 20 feet from the house. Keep up a 6-to 12-inch line between mulch or soil and wood parts of the house; foliage ought to be no less than 3 feet away. Point garden sprinklers from the establishment, and direct downspouts far from the house.

Play it safe

Try not to bring home wood unless it’s been dealt with to kill termites—most new sheets have. Keep vents clear so dry air can flow. Freshen up upper rooms, cellars, and creep spaces consistently.

Go on edge

Fill or fix any passage focuses, from torn blazing to breaks in your storm cellar’s solid. Screen patios, fence posts, and ledge plates for indications of termite intrigue.

Let down your monitor? Contract an ace

Get three offers, check references, analyze fight designs, and read the fine print. Fluid termiticides work by entering the foragers’ stomach related frameworks and traveling through the state when nourishment is shared. It’s a monstrous business, however get genuine: This is your home, not theirs.

Termites Remain Active in Winter

Termites Remain Active in Winter

Termites are pretty active all year round, even in the middle of winter. OF course, the middle of winter in Arizona is not the same as winter in, let’s say New England. But, our Arizona termite season is neverending.

When temperatures drop, termites do move below ground even farther, which can just mean they are tougher to find and seek out. The warmth that termites seek is deeper into the dirt, so they dig down farther and farther, but never really disappear.

Here in Arizona, queen termites produce eggs at a steady rate year round. Because our winters are fairly mild, egg production doesn’t necessarily slow down. Which could mean that there are termites laying eggs right now far below your home, just waiting to be born and attack your home.

In colder temperatures, queen termites do, in fact, slow down their egg production. While they don’t hibernate, they do cease egg production during the coldest months of winter.

Finding termites in the winter time inside your home is possible. Subterranean and drywood termites that have found shelter and food in your home’s foundation and walls will not be as affected by cold outdoor temperatures.

It’s imperative that you have a termite pest control come out to your home to inspect for termites immediately, particularly if termites have been in your neighborhood in the past few months. Termites can wreak havoc on your home, causing hundreds and thousands of dollars in damage, including hotel stays while pest control companies treat your home.

Kandice Linwright No Comments

Termites Hiding in Plain Sight

Termites Hiding in Plain Sight

Termites aren’t always easy to find. From rotting wood to water stains, strange lines on the garage wall to cracks in the foundation of your home, termites can hide in plain sight.

From Gilbert to Phoenix and Glendale, termites are invading the valley. They are causing millions in damage every year, and your home could be next.

Today, let’s talk about some of the places termites like to hide in plain sight…

Rotting Wood: When the mornings are dewey and moist, and water droplets form out of thin are and attach themselves to your car and grass, it’s easy to see some rotting wood along the trim of your house and think, “That’s perfectly normal. I’ll take care of it later.” Unfortunately, the longer you wait the more termites will invade your home. If you have rotting wood in your home, you have a termite problem…I can pretty much guarantee it.

Paint Chipping: Another tell tale sign of a termite problem is paint chipping along the wood of your home. Either on the wood trim around your roof, doors, and windows or the pain on the inside of your walls, these are all signs of a termite problem. Paint chipping could mean that the wood underneath that paint is moving, Moving would, disturbed wood, is a tell-tale sign of termites.

Hollow Trees: If you have any trees of firewood on your property, you probably have had termites, or you currently have a termite problem. It’s difficult to tell if termites are invading your trees unless you look closely. Any frass on the ground or sawdust could be a sign of termites hiding in plain sight. If you were to cut a branch off of one of your trees and notice termite tubes within the tree itself, you have a termite problem.

Oddly Shaped Designs: I drove past a home the other day with oddly designed lines running up from the patio roof to the bedroom window. Initially, these designs looked like water lines, perhaps left over after some house cleaning or heavy rain. Maybe you’ve noticed these strange lines on your foundation, the inside of your garage or the outside of your home? These strange lines are not water stains or dirt stains, they are termite tubes….termites hiding in plain sight.

If you think you might have a termite problem, call Magic Pest Control immediately.

Kandice Linwright No Comments

Heavy Termite Season Hitting Arizona

Heavy Termite Season Hitting Arizona

We have been seeing an influx of termite infestations here in Arizona. From Gilbert to Phoenix and Glendale, termites have invaded the valley. Part of the problem is that homeowners aren’t being diligent enough to seek out termite symptoms and signs of a termite problem until it’s too late.

Termites will hide within the walls of your home, but there are nearly always signs and symptoms of a termite problem.

Today, let’s talk about some of the termites that might be living in your home right now, and what to do about it…

Subterranean Termites

This termite species is extremely common in southern states and hotter climates. Subterranean termites live in underground colonies with as many as two million members and are also found in moist, secluded areas above ground. They build distinctive tunnels, often referred to as “mud tubes,” to reach food sources and protect themselves from open air. Subterranean termites are by far the most destructive termite species — their hard, saw-toothed jaws work like shears and are able to bite off extremely small fragments of wood, one piece at a time. Over time, they can collapse a building entirely, meaning possible financial ruin for a homeowner.

Signs of a Termite Problem

Symptom of Termite: Discarded Wings

What To Look For: Wings all of the same size (look like tiny fish scales) shredded near an entry point to your home.

Swarmers are usually winged and as a part of their behavior, they usually discard their wings in places like windowsills, doors or in cobwebs.

Symptom of Termite: Mud Tubes

What To Look For: Mud tubes are usually built by Subterranean termites, which are the most destructive species. As they move out from their colony in search of food, they build mud tubes to provide moisture. These mud tubes are often found near the foundation of the home, so those places should also be checked regularly.

Symptom of Termite: Wood Damage

What To Look For: Termites often eat wood from the inside out thereby making the wood soft. The damage may not be visible on the outside. The wood’s surface might still appear smooth even if termites are causing damage from inside. So if the wood sounds hollow when tapped, it may be because termites are eating the wood from the inside.

Symptom of Termite: Cracked Paint

What To Look For: Swarming drywood termites can enter through very tiny openings. Always try to cover up cracks in the home’s foundation, near roof siding, vents and windows. If your paint is cracking, it means there is moisture build up in it which could be as a result of either water damage or termite problems.

Symptom of Termite: Frass

What To Look For: As Drywood termites infest wood, they leave behind wood-colored droppings called frass. You can prevent this by keeping gutters and crawl spaces free of debris and cellulose materials so that termites don’t use them as sources of food.

Symptom of Termite: Noise

What To Look For: Some species of termites, like the soldier termites, usually make loud noises while eating or while trying to sound alarm to warn others of impending danger. The soldier termites make a banging noise with their heads on the wood to serve as an alarm to alert others. So if you tap on a piece of wood where you suspect termites, and you hear a loud banging sound, then there is termite infestation in your home.