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How Bed Bug Populations Reached Epidemic Levels

How Bed Bug Populations Reached Epidemic Levels | Bed Bug Control Phoenix Bed Bug Control

If there is one person who can answer all of your bed bug questions, then it would be author Brooke Borel. Borel writes for Popular Science Magazine, and she has conducted her own research on the behavior and biology of bed bugs. Most of her research focuses on what attracts bed bugs to humans. In addition to studying bed bugs, Borel has recently had a book published that describes the blood sucking creatures in detail; she has also experienced bed bug infestations herself. Recently, during an interview on National Public Radio, Borel described why bed bugs disappeared for several decades only to later return stronger and more resilient than they had been before before.

During the 1940s, scientists developed one of the first synthetic insecticides. This insecticide is now banned, but it was known as DDT, and it successfully destroyed bed bug populations, as well as many other insect species. During World War II, DDT was used by the Americans and British to fend off mosquitoes that carried malaria, as well as typhus-carrying lice. After the war, DDT became available to both pest control professional and consumers. People would often spray the chemical all over their homes, and DDT was included in many wallpapers, varnishes and paints. The widespread use of DDT during this time cannot be overstated.

DDT was so effective at killing bed bugs, the generations born after World War II had not even heard of the insects, as they had been virtually wiped out. This meant that pest controllers did not know how to treat bed bug infestations when the bugs resurfaced decades later. Bed bugs were so rare during the mid to late twentieth century that most professional entomologists had never been educated about bed bugs. According to Borel, to this day, experts cannot conclusively determine how bed bugs reappeared as aggressively as they did following several decades of inactivity. Many scientists believe that there had always been small pockets of bed bugs that had slowly adapted to survive DDT and other insecticide treatments over the course of several decades. However, this does not explain why bed bug activity was nearly nonexistent for so many years. Some believe that the spike in international travel that occurred during the 1980s led small pockets of surviving bed bugs to spread to urban areas all over the world by hitchhiking on travelers.

Do you believe that researchers are getting close to developing a revolutionary new insecticide that will work as effectively as DDT initially did during the middle of the twentieth century?

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People’s Complaints Over Bed Bug-Infested Airplanes Goes Viral

It is becoming common knowledge that bed bug infestations are increasing in hotels and motels. However, you may not have heard much about the increase in bed bug infestations aboard airline flights, but many people are being terrorized by these blood suckers while being thousands of feet in the air. Although the media has reported on numerous bed bug infestations on airplanes, many victims believe that the public is largely unaware of how often bed bug-related incidents occur during airline flights. This is why many people are taking to social media to share their stories concerning bed bug encounters on airplanes.Bed Bug Control

Recently, British Airways was forced to fumigate two airplanes after bed bugs were discovered during flights. Despite the fact that British Airways had been aware of a bed bug presence on the planes, they did very little to address the problem. In response to the lack of action taken by the airline to eradicate the bed bugs, one British Airways customer has started his own website where other angry bed bug victims can post their own complaints about the insects that they have found aboard airline flights. The person who started the website, Zane Selkirk, first posted pictures of the injuries that she had sustained from bed bugs while aboard a British Airways flight. The pictures showed bed bug bites covering her hands, legs and feet. Once these pics went viral, British Airways finally took action to eradicate the bed bug presence within their airplanes. Last year, another person who had been attacked by bed bugs on a United Airlines flight sent a letter to the New York Times detailing his experience. Despite all of these complaints, and the fact that bed bugs on airplanes is clearly a problem, very few statistics, if any, on bed bug problems within airplanes can be found. So far, bed bug complaints have been reported solely by business class customers, and not first class fliers.

Do you think that bed bugs will be on your mind the next time you fly an airline? Or do you prefer bed bug-free first class?

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Magic Pest Control’s Back to School Bed Bug Advice for College Students

As college students prepare to return to campuses nationwide, many plan to bring secondhand furniture including mattresses, futons, dressers, couches and more. As bags are being packed, and students begin to move in, Magic Pest Control is urging students in the Phoenix are to inspect new lodgings, personal belongings, and secondhand items, for bed bugs as these pests can cause painful, red itchy welts and can also spread quickly when introduced to new environments.

According to the National Pest Management Association (NPMA), bed bugs pose serious concerns to dorm rooms and thrive in university environments as there are often many people living in a confined space. In fact, a 2015 survey, conducted by the NPMA and the University of Kentucky, found that bed bug infestations in the United States continue at high rates, with 99.6 percent of pest professionals treating for bed bugs in the year prior.

Bed bugs are opportunistic and elusive pests. As students return from summers filled with travel they may unknowingly be transporting bed bugs to college campuses. Or, they could be returning to an environment where bed bugs are already a problem. It is essential that students inspect all belongings to help keep these pests at bay. Bed bugs are not only undesirable for students but also for parents who don’t want their children bringing these pests home on breaks.

Magic Pest Control offers tips to help prevent bed bugs from taking up residence in dorms:

  • Fully inspect suitcases prior to re-packing for a return to school, especially if you have traveled during the summer. Wash all clothes, even those that haven’t been worn, in hot water.
  • On move-in day, thoroughly inspect the entire room including mattress seams on beds, behind the headboard and in furniture using a flashlight for good visibility. If you see anything suspect, immediately contact a university facility manager or landlord.
  • If you are considering bringing “secondhand” furniture to campus, properly inspect it for telltale signs of bed bugs. If you notice and signs of shed skins, small blot marks/pepper-like stains do not bring it to campus.

Students are urged to follow prevention tips when packing for school and before unpacking in a new room. For more information on preventing bed bugs, visit www.magicpest.com

How to Avoid Bed Bugs While Traveling

How to Avoid Bed Bugs While Traveling

It’s travel season! Whether you’re heading to grandma’s through the woods, or to your mom’s house across the pond, bed bugs are a real threat during the holidays, especially if you’re staying at a hotel.

Don’t head to a hotel for the holidays without reading this…

Bedbugs can easily hide in luggage, clothing, and other personal items, so take a few precautions while traveling to keep them from ruining your trip—or worse—coming home with you!

  • As much as we all love our very own pillows, don’t bring yours with you while traveling. It gives bed bugs a perfect place to hide so they can make their way into your home. Leave your favorite pillow and blanket on your bed at home.
  • Pack some large white sealable plastic garbage bags so you can separate any belongings while on the road if you do notice bugs in a hotel room or someone’s home.
  • Purchase light-colored plastic luggage because bedbugs are less attracted to plastic and the lighter color makes them easier to spot. If only have dark luggage or cloth luggage, you can enclose the luggage in a white plastic garbage bag and seal it.
  • When you check into your hotel room, follow these steps: 1) Do a complete inspection of the room. 2) Don’t put luggage on the bed. 3) Inspect the bed very carefully using a flashlight. 4) Check drawers and closets, also. 5) Never store anything under the bed. 6) Keep your stuff in your luggage, if you’re able to. 7) Inform hotel staff immediately if you find bed bugs.

Check out these great tips for avoiding bed bugs:

  • Before you check out your hotel room’s minibar or oceanfront view, give it a thorough bedbug inspection—and until you’ve done that, stash your luggage in the loo.
  • Here’s how to check for a bedbug infestation: Pull back the linens, and check all the way around and under the mattress and behind the headboard.
  • Next, broaden your bedbug search to the area immediately surrounding the bed: behind picture frames, under the telephone and alarm clock, and even in books, says Johnson.
  • Leaving suitcases and bags on the floor—or on a second spare bed—may be one way to bring home an unwanted souvenir, says Henriksen.
  • With a little Internet research, it’s easy to find out if bedbugs have been reported at your hotel: The Bed Bug Registry, for example, is a free online database of user-submitted reports across North America. Travel sites like TripAdvisor and Yelp may also offer clues in their customer reviews.

And, if you do bring bed bugs home, you’ll want do this:

1. Find the hideouts of the bedbug: Start by finding the hideouts of the bedbugs; dismantle the bed check for any dark spots for dried bed bug excrement on the cracks and edges of wooden frames and also along mattress seams.

To avoid purchasing a new mattress and for easy inspection in future you can use a bed bug proof mattress cover to trap them inside the cover.

(It can take up to 400 days to starve them in the cover)

2. Inspect your upholstery: inspect the sofa sets and the cushions since sofas can be a major hideout especially when people sleep on them.

3. Check the walls and common places of your house: bed bugs will also find the walls, ceiling and cracks in wood moldings a nice place for them to congregate and also lay their eggs. A flashlight can be of great help to check at the dark edges.

4. Treating: There are several methods for treating and even controlling bed bugs in your premises. You can kill bed bugs by washing infested beddings and spreading hot water over the wooden beds and furniture. Hot machine wash is recommended for the clothing and for those valuable such as leather jackets you can use non-toxic bed bug sprays.

Using parathyroid insecticides are also another advisable way for treating and controlling these pests in your home. You will have to spray on the cracks crevices on the walls .You will need to spray the insecticides for several times to make sure that you kill any bed bug that could have escaped the attack and the eggs that could have hatched from the hideouts.

In serious cases like where the clothing and bedding have been infested a lot you may need to dispose those that have highly been infested to avoid recurring infest.