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Scorpions are not usually considered to be household pests; instead, the arachnids are commonly believed to be dangerous to humans only when they are encountered in the wild. This assumption makes a bit of sense. After all, scorpions have adapted to thrive within diverse environmental conditions, including some of the harshest environments on the planet, so why would they need to seek refuge within homes? As it happens, this assumption is ultimately wrong, and if you are an Arizona native, you likely know this already. In reality, scorpions infest homes and buildings frequently in Arizona and other nearby states. For example, during the early summer of 2017, one couple’s north Phoenix apartment unit became infested with numerous scorpions that were capable of dealing out painful and potentially dangerous stings to humans.

Shortly after moving into their new apartment, Christian Costanzo and his wife realized that their unit was already occupied by dozens of scorpions. For several days, the couple spotted several scorpions both inside and outside of their apartment unit, but once Costanzo’s wife sustained a sting, the couple decided to notify the apartment’s front desk workers about the horrific and hazardous infestation within their unit. Unfortunately, Costanzo claimed that he and his wife were laughed out of the office by an employee after complaining. At one point, the couple were even told that their situation was a natural consequence of living within Arizona. Understandably, this response did not satisfy the couple, so they took their complaint straight to the manager who then sent a pest controller into the unit in order to apply insecticide. Unfortunately, this treatment did not work, as scorpions require a relatively high dose of insecticide in order to be exterminated. Frustrated, Costanzo set out to prove the seriousness of the infestation by capturing a few scorpions near and within his apartment unit. Within a mere 30 minutes, Costanzo had captured well over 30 scorpions, and he also had pictures of the arachnids within his unit as proof of the infestation. Costanzo also claimed to have killed or captured 14 specimens within his unit since he moved in six months prior. Not surprisingly, Costanzo became determined to break his lease, and after proof of the infestation was provided to a local news team, management was less resistant about allowing him to break his lease. However, when asked for a comment on the matter by the news team, the manager simply denied that an infestation of scorpions existed within the building.

Have you ever stepped on a venomous insect or arachnid?

 

 

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